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et tu, Brute?

Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, interpreted by our Middle School students

et tu, Brute?

Middle School students spent the first two months of 2018 studying Shakespeare's Julius Caesar in Humanities. Through reading the original play, supporting historical texts and primary documents, students explored the concepts of power, potentates and perspective. As a project-based unit, students worked in self-chosen groups to create digital works that exemplified their understanding of Caesar in various ways. Check out their projects, which were recently shared during our inaugural Black Box Theatre event!

 

Slaves of Rome

Aparna & Nicole

Inspired by Ken Burns' filmmaking, Aparna & Nicole decided to collect and share a montage of images from Roman times along with a narration of a slave's perspective of life under Julius Caesar's rule. Written, created and produced entirely by these two 8th level students, this short piece is poignant and powerful.


GladiatorAde

Sadie, Grace & Violet

With Grace's whip smart scripting, this team created a commercial for 'GladiatorAde' after being inspired by an actual drink that Roman Gladiators believed helped them in battle. 

GladCo Chariot Insurance

Sofia & Olivia 

This team used Geico's witty, off beat ads as inspiration for 'GladCo Chariot Insurance.' This final version reflects fantastic work in editing multiple angles.


Caesar's Vacation

Luka, Adithya & Arjun

This group decided they'd explore what would happen if Caesar came back to life today! Their story includes news-style interviews and humorous encounters between Caesar (Luka), Brutus (Adithya) and their news reporter, Arjun.


Romecraft

Taylor, Ellis, Adrik, Lucas & Dev

This team decided they would build, from scratch, some of the buildings of Rome including the Colosseum, Senate Building and amphitheater using Minecraft. Once their digital stage was set, they added avatars to represent characters from the play, acting out scenes and recording voiceovers. By mathematical estimates done by the students, they've used over 1.2 MILLION blocks in this creation.